Keywords

Caribbean literature (French), Caribbean literature (French) -- Translating into English, Caribbean literature (French) -- Women authors, Hypertext systems, Schwarz Bart, Simone -- Pluie et vent sur T'lum'e Miracle, Translating and interpreting -- Technological innovations, Translators in literature, XML (Document markup language)

Abstract

In this qualitative study, I examine the utilization of electronic publication and electronic writing systems to provide new possibilities for the translation of French Caribbean literary texts. Using Simone Schwarz‐Bart’s 1972 novel Pluie et vent sur Télumée Miracle specifically for analysis and exploration, I investigate the potential of digital technology to aid in the production of literary translations that are mindful not only of the dynamics of language, but of French Caribbean women’s discourse as well. Since the cultural turn of translation studies, translators need not only be bilingual but bicultural as well, having a discerning knowledge and familiarity of the culture that they render. Cultural translation scholars, therefore, have argued that translators should make the reasons for their translation choices known through annotations, prefaces, introductions, or footnotes. Advancing this established claim through critical and theoretical analysis and the construction of hypermediated textual translation samples from Pluie et Vent, I argue that translators can make their choices known by utilizing digital writing and hypermedia tools, such as TEI‐conformant XML, for computer assisted translation (CAT) and electronic publication. By moving a new translation of Schwarz‐Bart’s text to a digital space, translators have more options in how they present their renderings including what information to include for better textual interpretation and analysis. The role, thus, of the translator has expanded. This person is not just a translator of language and culture, but an editor who provides scholarly information for critical interpretation. She is also a programmer who is skilled in new media iv writing and editing tools and uses those tools rhetorically to invent new methods for the electronic translation of literature.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2011

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Murphy, Patrick D.

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

English

Degree Program

Texts and Technology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004101

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004101

Language

English

Release Date

December 2014

Length of Campus-only Access

3 years

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Subjects

Arts and Humanities -- Dissertations, Academic, Dissertations, Academic -- Arts and Humanities

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