Keywords

Blue phase liquid crystal, Liquid crystal

Abstract

With exploding growth of information exchanges between people, display has become indispensable in our daily lives. After decades of intensive research and development in materials and devices, and massive investment in manufacturing technologies, liquid crystal display (LCD) has overcome various obstacles and achieved the performance we need, such as wide viewing angle, high contrast ratio, and high resolution, etc. These excellent performances make LCD prevailed in every perspective. Recently, with the demands of energy conservation, a greener LCD with lower power consumption is desired. In order to achieve this goal, new energy-effective driving methods, such as field sequential color display, have been proposed. However, in order to suppress color breakup the LC response time should be faster than 1 ms. To overcome this challenge, various fast-response liquid crystal modes, such as thin cell gap, low viscosity materials, overdrive and undershoot voltages, polymer stabilization, and ferroelectric liquid crystal, are under active investigations. Among these approaches, blue phase liquid crystal (BPLC) shows a greater potential with less fabrication limitations. In this dissertation, the feasibility of polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystal for display applications is explored starting from the building blocks of the material system, polymer-stabilization processes, test cell preparations, electro-optical (EO) properties, to suggested approaches for further improvements. iv Because of the nature of blue phase liquid crystals, delicate balance among system components is critically important. Besides the properties of each composition, the preparation process also dictates the EO performance of the self-assembled nano-structured BPLC composite. After the preparation of test cells, EO properties for display applications are investigated and results described. Approaches for further improvements of the EO properties are also suggested in the final part of this dissertation.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2012

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Wu, Shintson

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Optics and Photonics

Department

Optics and Photonics

Degree Program

Optics

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004243

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004243

Language

English

Release Date

May 2012

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Optics and Photonics, Optics and Photonics -- Dissertations, Academic

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