Keywords

C.s. lewis, the ransom trilogy, the space trilogy, out of the silent planet, perelandra, that hideous strength, sacrament, violence, myth, war, theology, psychology

Abstract

My primary aim for this study is to illuminate the Ransom trilogy’s inherent psychological and spiritual themes, as well as demonstrate how these themes clarify Lewis’s philosophical and political goals for the text. Specifically, by investigating Lewis’s mythic imagery and suffering motifs in light of psychoanalytic and theological literary criticisms, I elucidate the reasoning behind Lewis’s unique—and at times, horrific—portrayal of fear, violence, and death. I also investigate how Lewis integrates his theology with the horrors of personal and intrapersonal suffering, as well as how he utilizes imagination and myth to explicate the practical (or political) implications of his theodicy. As a whole, I present a systematic study of the relationship between the Great War, myth, and the three Ransom novels, one which reveals how Lewis manipulates his personal traumatic experiences to fashion a romantic Christian understanding of evil and violence in the modern world

Notes

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Graduation Date

2012

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Campbell, James

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Graduate Studies

Department

Office of Interdisciplinary Studies

Degree Program

Interdisciplinary Studies

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004279

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004279

Language

English

Release Date

May 2012

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Graduate Studies, Graduate Studies -- Dissertations, Academic

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