Keywords

Wireless MEMS sensors, low power CMOS circuits, accelerometer, RF transmitter, reliability of RF circuits

Abstract

A sensor node 'AccuMicroMotion' is proposed that has the ability to detect motion in 6 degrees of freedom for the application of physiological activity monitoring. It is expected to be light weight, low power, small and cheap. The sensor node may collect and transmit 3 axes of acceleration and 3 axes of angular rotation signals from MEMS transducers wirelessly to a nearby base station while attached to or implanted in human body. This dissertation proposes a wireless electronic system-on-a-single-chip to implement the sensor in a traditional CMOS process. The system is low power and may operate 50 hours from a single coin cell battery. A CMOS readout circuit, an analog to digital converter and a wireless transmitter is designed to implement the proposed system. In the architecture of the 'AccuMicroMotion' system, the readout circuit uses chopper stabilization technique and can resolve DC to 1 KHz and 200 nV signals from MEMS transducers. The base band signal is digitized using a 10-bit successive approximation register analog to digital converter. Digitized outputs from up to nine transducers can be combined in a parallel to serial converter for transmission by a 900 MHz RF transmitter that operates in amplitude shift keying modulation technique. The transmitter delivers a 2.2 mW power to a 50 Ù antenna. The system consumes an average current of 4.8 mA from a 3V supply when 6 sensors are in operation and provides an overall 60 dB dynamic range. Furthermore, in this dissertation, a methodology is developed that applies accelerated electrical stress on MOS devices to extract BSIM3 models and RF parameters through measurements to perform comprehensive study, analysis and modeling of several analog and RF circuits under hot carrier and breakdown degradation.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2004

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Yuan, Jiann-Shiun

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Degree Program

Electrical Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0000304

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0000304

Language

English

Release Date

December 2004

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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