Keywords

Laser spectroscopy, laser filamentation, laser ablation, filament ablation

Abstract

Laser filamentation is a non-diffracting propagation regime consisting of an intense core that is surrounded by an energy reservoir. For laser ablation based spectroscopy techniques such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), laser filamentation enables the remote delivery of high power density laser radiation at long distances. This work shows a quasiconstant filament-induced mass ablation along a 35 m propagation distance. The mass ablated is sufficient for the application of laser filamentation as a sampling tool for plasma based spectroscopy techniques. Within the scope of this study, single-shot ablation was compared with multi-shot ablation. The dependence of ablated mass on the number of pulses was observed to have a quasi-linear dependence on the number of pulses, advantageous for applications such as spectroscopy. Sample metrology showed that both physical and optical material properties have significant effects on the filament-induced ablation behavior. A relatively slow filament-induced plasma expansion was observed, as compared with a focused beam. This suggests that less energy was transferred to the plasma during filamentinduced ablation. The effects of the filament core and the energy reservoir on the filamentinduced ablation and plasma formation were investigated. Goniometric measurements of the filament-induced plasma, along with radiometric calculations, provided the number of emitted photons from a specific atomic transition and sample material. This work advances the understanding of the effects of single filaments on the ablation of solid materials and the understanding of filament-induced plasma dynamics. It has lays the foundation for further quantitative studies of multiple filamentation. The implications of this iv work extend beyond spectroscopy and include any application of filamentation that involves the interaction with a solid material

Notes

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Graduation Date

2012

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Richardson, Martin

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Optics and Photonics

Department

Optics and Photonics

Degree Program

Optics

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004616

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004616

Language

English

Release Date

December 2017

Length of Campus-only Access

5 years

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Campus-only Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Optics and Photonics, Optics and Photonics -- Dissertations, Academic

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