Keywords

Altruism, burnout, school counseling

Abstract

The present study investigated the directional relationship between practicing school counselors’ level of altruism to their degree of burnout. Specifically, this investigation tested the hypothesized directional relationship that practicing school counselors scoring at higher levels of altruism would have lower levels of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal accomplishment). In addition, the investigation examined the relationship between the practicing school counselors’ levels altruism and burnout and their reported demographic information (e.g., age, school counseling level, self-reported levels of wellness). A thorough review of the literature is presented with supporting empirical research for each construct (altruism and burnout). A descriptive, correlational research design (Frankel et al., 2012) was employed to investigate the research hypothesis and exploratory questions. The research hypothesis was analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). More specifically, multiple regression, path analysis, and confirmatory factor analysis (Ullman, 2007) were conducted. The exploratory research questions were examined using: descriptive statistics, Spearman’s rho correlations, multiple regressions, Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann Whitney U test (Pallant, 2010). The results are reviewed and compared to existing research in the field. Furthermore, limitations of the current study are explained, and recommendations for future research are provided. Finally, implications of the study regarding professional school counseling and counselor education are discussed. The overall sample for this study is 437 practicing school counselors (ASCA members, n = 344; non-ASCA members, n = 93). The results of the study support that school counselors with higher levels of altruism have lower levels of burnout. The findings of this study show two dimensions of altruistic motivation: (1) positive future expectations and (2) self-efficacy v contribute significantly to all dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment). Additionally, a significant relationship was found between altruism and burnout and self-reported wellness.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2013

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Robinson, Edward

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Education and Human Performance

Department

Dean's Office, Education

Degree Program

Education; Counselor Education

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004710

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004710

Language

English

Release Date

May 2013

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Education, Education -- Dissertations, Academic

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