Keywords

Repurposing, digital, second orality, creativity, dystopia, apocalyptic

Abstract

This dissertation argues that Digital Natives, rather than employing novel ways of thinking (such as those suggested by Walter Ong’s concept of Second Orality), are in fact employing a way of thinking that has always existed: repurposing. Ruth Oldenziel discusses how, historically, women used “a kind of mental quality” enabling them to re-use objects in novel ways to accomplish more of life’s tasks. My research led me to investigate how a wide variety of people, especially historically marginalized people, used this kind of mental quality. This dissertation explores repurposing’s real world uses as well as its uses in narratives, specifically dystopia and apocalyptic narratives. Within these narratives, repurposing plays a similar role to repurposing in the real world, filling the gap between a survival mode of life and a science/technology driven society. The last part of this dissertation explores the place of repurposing among a myriad of current concepts concerning creativity.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu

Graduation Date

2013

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Mauer, Barry

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

Dean's Office, Arts and Humanities

Degree Program

Texts and Technology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0005010

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0005010

Language

English

Release Date

December 2013

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Subjects

Arts and Humanities -- Dissertations, Academic, Dissertations, Academic -- Arts and Humanities

Share

COinS