Keywords

Knowledge management, documented knowledge, codified knowledge, knowledge transfer, knowledge creation

Abstract

Despite the volume, growth, and accessibility of documented knowledge – the insights and experiences stored on paper and in electronic form - management research has yet to demonstrate the same usefulness for documented knowledge as that found in knowledge residing in human sources. This dissertation explores two areas of potential for documented knowledge, suggesting the efficacy of a piece of documented knowledge is contingent not only on content, but upon the style and structure associated with that content. Style, how cognitively ‘concrete’ and affectively ‘memorable’ documented knowledge is perceived to be, is hypothesized to affect how much attention it draws and, in turn, to impact its transfer to users. Structure, reflecting the level of parsimony and modularity in documented knowledge, is hypothesized to impact attention to and manipulation of knowledge such that it affects knowledge transfer and creation. Hypotheses were tested in two laboratory studies using scientific research as an exemplar of documented knowledge. Results indicated that style was associated with documented knowledge, but was not related to its transfer. Likewise, structuring documented knowledge for greater parsimony and modularity did not improve knowledge transfer or knowledge creation. Shortcomings of the empirical tests are evaluated and possibilities for future improvements are discussed.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2013

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Ford, Cameron

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Business Administration

Department

Dean's Office, Business Administration

Degree Program

Business Administration; Management

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004717

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004717

Language

English

Release Date

May 2016

Length of Campus-only Access

3 years

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Subjects

Business Administration -- Dissertations, Academic, Dissertations, Academic -- Business Administration

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