Keywords

heat transfer, wall, shock tube, shock wave, test time, endwall region, average temperature, reflected shock, thermal boundary layer, test temperature

Abstract

Shock-tube experiments are typically performed at high temperatures (≥1200K) due to test-time constraints. These test times are usually ~1 ms in duration and the source of this short, test-time constraint is loss of temperature due to heat transfer. At short test times, there is very little appreciable heat transfer between the hot gas and the cold walls of the shock tube and a high test temperature can be maintained. However, some experiments are using lower temperatures (approx. 800K) to achieve ignition and require much longer test times (up to 15 ms) to fully study the chemical kinetics and combustion chemistry of a reaction in a shock-tube experiment. Using mathematical models, analysis was performed studying the effects of temperature, pressure, shock-tube inner diameter, and test-port location at various test times (from 1 - 20 ms) on temperature maintenance. Three models, each more complex than the previous, were used to simulate test conditions in the endwall region behind the reflected shock wave with Ar and N2 as bath gases. Temperature profile, thermal BL thickness, and other parametric results are presented herein. It was observed that higher temperatures and lower pressures contributed to a thicker thermal boundary layer, as did shrinking inner diameter. Thus it was found that a test case such as 800K and 50 atm in a 16.2-cm-diameter shock tube in Argon maintained thermal integrity much better than other cases - pronounced by a thermal boundary layer ≤ 1 mm thick and an average temperature ≥ 799.9 K from 1-20 ms.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2007

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Petersen, Eric

Degree

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (M.S.M.E.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering;

Degree Program

Mechanical Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001593

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001593

Language

English

Release Date

May 2007

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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