Keywords

Training, Route, Simulation, Model, Navigation, Retention

Abstract

In the case of one car following another to a destination, it is very effective at getting the second vehicle to the destination quickly; however, the driver of the second car may not learn the route. Yet, for individuals, such as firefighters, law enforcement, and military personnel, it is imperative that a route be learned quickly and accurately and that an awareness of the situation is maintained while they traverse the given route. This leads to three questions, (a) will navigation aids affect initial route navigation; (b) will navigation aids affect retention; and (c) will navigation aids affect situation awareness while en route? The hypotheses of this study were that navigation aids would significantly increase the speed at which a person can initially navigate a route, but the use of the aids would significantly decrease the retention of the route navigated. The findings of this study support the hypotheses. The results suggest that participants that followed a confederate and participants that were given verbal directions were quicker and made fewer errors than participants that reviewed a map or initially figured the route out on their own (control group). The study also showed that as the participants navigated the route for a second time with no navigational assistance, the ones that reviewed a map or that were in the control group outperformed participants that initially had a confederate to follow or were given verbal directions their first time through. Finally, no real effects were found on the participants' situation awareness during the retention portion of the study.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2005

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Lee, Gene

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Degree Program

Modeling and Simulation

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0000520

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0000520

Language

English

Release Date

May 2005

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Included in

Engineering Commons

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