Keywords

Retention

Abstract

Retention of students having academic difficulties continues to be a very popular intervention, even though many studies suggest that retention of students does not improve their academic success or their social and emotional attitude towards school. This study was based on an analysis of 10,875 Seminole County students that had been retained at least one time in their educational career. The study used 2006-2007 FCAT Reading and Math scores to determine the success of their retentions. Students were grouped by the categories of gender, age, race, grade retained, ESE status, ELL status and SES and their success evaluated. The study supports the conclusions of the critics of retention and, based on trends found in the data, makes some recommendations that may improve the retention process. Specifically, the study recommends (a) for students in the high risk categories alternative interventions instead of or in addition to the retention whenever possible; (b) retention in the first grade rather than in kindergarten; (c) earlier ESE screening of students at risk for retention; (d)continued progress monitoring and intervention after the retention year; (e) continued on-level math instruction for students retained for poor reading achievement; and finally, (f) getting the parents of the retained students more involved in the process.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2008

Advisor

Murray, Barbara

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education

Department

Educational Research, Technology and Leadership

Degree Program

Educational Leadership

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0002017

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0002017

Language

English

Release Date

June 2008

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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