Keywords

cell patterning, polyelectrolyte multilayers, layer-by-layer, photolithography, protein adsorption, cell culture

Abstract

Integration of living cells with novel microdevices requires the development of innovative technologies for manipulating cells. Chemical surface patterning has been proven as an effective method to control the attachment and growth of diverse cell populations. Patterning polyelectrolyte multilayers through the combination of layer-by-layer self-assembly technique and photolithography offers a simple, versatile and silicon compatible approach that overcomes chemical surface patterning limitations, such as short-term stability and low protein adsorption resistance. In this study, direct photolithographic patterning of PAA/PAAm and PAA/PAH polyelectrolyte multilayers was developed to pattern mammalian neuronal, skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. For all studied cell types, PAA/PAAm multilayers behaved as a negative surface, completely preventing cell attachment. In contrast, PAA/PAH multilayers have shown a cell-selective behavior, promoting the attachment and growth of neuronal cells (embryonic rat hippocampal and NG108-15 cells) to a greater extent, while providing a little attachment for neonatal rat cardiac and skeletal muscle cells (C2C12 cell line). PAA/PAAm multilayer cellular patterns have also shown a remarkable protein adsorption resistance. Protein adsorption protocols commonly used for surface treatment in cell culture did not compromise the cell attachment inhibiting feature of the PAA/PAAm multilayer patterns. The combination of polyelectrolyte multilayer patterns with different adsorbed proteins could expand the applicability of this technology to cell types that require specific proteins either on the surface or in the medium for attachment or differentiation, and could not be patterned using the traditional methods.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2008

Advisor

Cho, Hyoung-Jin

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Program

Materials Science and Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0002357

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0002357

Language

English

Release Date

December 2008

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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