Keywords

Microchannel, Microfluids, Pipe Bends, Sweeping Bends, Pressure Loss

Abstract

MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) have received a great deal of attention in both the research and industrial sectors in recent decades. The broad MEMS category, microfluidics, the study of fluid flow through channels measured on the micrometer scale, plays an important role in devices such as compact heat exchangers, chemical and biological sensors, and lab-on-a-chip devices. Most of the research has been focused on how entire systems operate, both experimentally and through simulation. This paper strives, systematically, to map them through experimentation of the previous to untested realm of pressure loss through laminar square-profile sweeping-bend microchannels. Channels were fabricated in silicone and designed so a transducer could detect static pressure across a very specific length of channel with a desired bend. A wide variety of Reynolds numbers, bend radii, and bend angles were repeatedly tested over long periods in order to acquire a complete picture of pressure loss with in the domain of experimentation. Nearly all situations tested were adequately captured with the exception of some very low loss points that were too small to detect accurately. The bends were found to match laminar straight-duct theory at Reynolds numbers below 30. As Reynolds numbers increased, however, minor losses began to build and the total pressure loss across the bend rose above straight-duct predictions. A new loss coefficient equation was produced that properly predicted pressure losses for sweeping-bends at higher Reynolds numbers; while lower flow ranges are left to laminar flow loss for prediction.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2008

Advisor

Chew, Larry

Degree

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (M.S.M.E.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Program

Mechanical Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0002091

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0002091

Language

English

Release Date

June 2008

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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