Keywords

Varying levels of academic achievement among Hispanic High School Students

Abstract

This study examined academic achievement levels of Hispanic high school students. Seven high schools in Orange County Public Schools in Orlando, Florida were selected. The schools were selected based on socio-economic status and demographics to provide a wide range of participation. The following are some of the purposes that guided this study: (a) to determine if there are differences in academic achievement among Hispanic high school students in each school, (b) to determine differences in academic achievement based on gender, (c) to determine differences in academic achievement based on LEP status, and (d) to determine if there is a relationship between grade point average and FCAT Reading scores and FCAT Mathematic scores. The findings of this study were delineated through an examination of data using mean Grade Point Averages, mean Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test Scores (Reading and Mathematics), socio-economics, gender, Limited English Proficiency status, and attendance. This study supported, but are not limited to, the following conclusions: (a) There was a difference in grade point averages among Hispanic high school students, (b) Hispanic students have lower mean grade point averages and lower mean FCAT Reading and Mathematic scores when compared to the school as a whole, (c) there are relationships between attendance and grade point averages and there is a relationship between grade point average and FCAT Reading and Mathematic scores (d) there are differences in grade point averages between male and female Hispanic students, (e) there is a difference in grade point average based on socio-economic level, and (f) there is a difference in grade point averages based on LEP status. Recommendations of the study include but are not limited to (a) further research in the area of academic achievement among Hispanic students but to disaggregate Hispanics to look for distinct differences. (b) research in the area of comparing LEP students and academic achievement., (c) research to determine why there is a disparity in numbers of 9th grade Hispanic students and 12th grade Hispanic students, (d) research of Hispanic students by doing a longitudinal study. The longitudinal study should follow 9th grade students from the high schools in one or more county through four years.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu

Graduation Date

2005

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Taylor, Rosemayre

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education

Department

Educational Research, Technology and Leadership

Degree Program

Educational Leadership

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0000574

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0000574

Language

English

Release Date

August 2005

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Share

COinS