Keywords

Combustion in porous media, heterogeneous combustion, superadiabatic combustion, filtration combustion, matrix stabilized combustion, silicon carbide, sic, combustion, methane, lean, nox, exhaust gas recirculation, egr, reactor length, surface area, estimation surface area, modeling, reactor design, liquid combustion, fuel evaporation, premixed combustion, radiative emitter, pilot flame

Abstract

Combustion with a high surface area continuous solid immersed within the flame, referred to as combustion in porous media, is an innovative approach to combustion as the solid within the flame acts as an internal regenerator distributing heat from the combustion byproducts to the upstream reactants. By including the solid structure, radiative energy extraction becomes viable, while the solid enables a vast extension of flammability limits compared to conventional flames, while offering dramatically reduced emissions of NOx and CO, and dramatically increased burning velocities. Efforts documented within are used for the development of a streamlined set of design principles, and characterization of the flame's behavior when operating under such conditions, to aid in the development of future combustors for lean burn applications in open flow systems. Principles described herein were developed from a combination of experimental work and reactor network modeling using CHEMKIN-PRO. Experimental work consisted of a parametric analysis of operating conditions pertaining to reactant flow, combustion chamber geometric considerations and the viability of liquid fuel applications. Experimental behavior observed, when utilizing gaseous fuels, was then used to validate model outputs through comparing thermal outputs of both systems. Specific details pertaining to a streamlined chemical mechanism to be used in simulations, included within the appendix, and characterization of surface area of the porous solid are also discussed. Beyond modeling the experimental system, considerations are also undertaken to examine the applicability of exhaust gas recirculation and staged combustion as a means of controlling the thermal and environmental output of porous combustion systems. This work was supported by ACS PRF "51768-ND10 and NSF IIP 1343454.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2014

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Orlovskaya, Nina

Degree

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (M.S.M.E.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Program

Mechanical Engineering; Thermo-Fluids Track

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0005269

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0005269

Language

English

Release Date

May 2014

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Engineering and Computer Science; Engineering and Computer Science -- Dissertations, Academic

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