Keywords

Error management training

Abstract

Error management training has been praised as an effective strategy for facilitating adaptive transfer. However, potential variations have not yet been examined to determine if an alternative format may be equally or more effective. As standard practice, error-related instructions in error management training encourage learners to make errors and to view these errors as learning opportunities. Also, an overwhelming majority of research on this topic has focused learner development of procedural computer software skills. The empirical literature provides little guidance in terms of the boundaries within which error management training is an effective training approach. The purpose of this research was to examine the relative effectiveness of a modified error management training approach for influencing adaptive transfer in contrast to both standard error management training and error avoidant training. The modified error management approach encouraged learners to do their best to avoid errors, but maintained traditional instructions to learn from errors. The effectiveness of these three training conditions for promoting adaptive transfer was examined in two studies. The first study applied the error strategies to a complex decision-making task, and the second study compared the strategies relative effectiveness for a fine motor skills task. Study 1 results indicated that both error management training approaches were associated with higher adaptive learning compared to an error avoidant training approach. Error management and the modified error management did not significantly differ. In Study 2, error management training and error avoidant training both demonstrated greater adaptive transfer than did the modified approach. The mediating roles of metacognition and emotion regulation were examined, but unsupported, in both studies. Implications for future research and organizational practice are discussed.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2014

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Salas, Eduardo

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Psychology; Industrial and Organization Track

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0005372

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0005372

Language

English

Release Date

August 2017

Length of Campus-only Access

3 years

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Sciences; Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic

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