Abstract

The field of nanocatalysis has gained significant attention in the last decades due to the numerous industrial applications of nanosized catalysts. Size, shape, structure, and composition of the nanoparticles (NPs) are the parameters that can affect the reactivity, selectivity and stability of nanocatalysts. Therefore, understanding how these parameters affect the catalytic properties of these systems is required in order to engineer them with a given desired performance. It is also important to gain insight into the structural evolution of the NP catalysts under different reaction conditions to design catalysts with long durability under reaction condition. In this dissertation a synergistic combination of in situ, ex situ and operando state-of-the art techniques have allowed me to explore a variety of parameters and phenomena relevant to nanocatalysts by systematically tuning the NP size, chemical state, composition and chemical environment.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu

Graduation Date

2016

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Physics

Degree Program

Physics

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006243

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006243

Language

English

Release Date

August 2016

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Share

COinS