Abstract

Domestic and sexual trauma that occurs during the time a soldier is actively serving in the military are difficult for researchers to measure in large part because the Department of Defense does not report these offenses to the public. Recent combat missions to the Middle East have increased mental health issues among soldiers, but it is unclear whether these issues are related to domestic violence and sexual trauma soldiers may have endured. The purpose of this study is to investigate how combat operations may have increased domestic violence and sexual trauma among soldiers. An auto ethnographic method is used to explore two waves of marriages in relation to two waves of combat deployments. Several themes were present in both waves of deployment and marriages. Emergent themes were heavy alcohol consumption and mental health issues, which resulted in an increase in domestic violence rates post-deployment. Military sexual trauma also emerged in the findings and was present in both the pre and post-deployment phases.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2016

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Huff-Corzine, Lin

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Sociology

Degree Program

Applied Sociology; Domestic Violence

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006288

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006288

Language

English

Release Date

August 2016

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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