Abstract

Research looking into the relationship between masculinity and condoms has typically centered on how masculinity ideology acts as a deterrent toward condom use. The current study focuses on the social pairing between larger sized condoms and masculinity by examining the factors that predict the preference for larger sized condoms. Specifically, the current analysis uses survey data collected from a sample of 398 University of Central Florida students to examine the predictive role of gender, race/ethnicity, gendered-identification, relationship status, perceived penis size, condom malfunction experience, the opinion that men would be less reluctant to use condoms if offered a larger option, the opinion that men with larger penises are more masculine, and the opinion that men who use larger condoms are more masculine on preferences for larger sized condoms. Results of the analysis show that the model was highly predictive of preferences for larger sized condoms, with five out of the nine factors considered having a significant effect. The results indicated that relationship status, perceived penis size, the opinion that men would be less reluctant to use condoms if offered a larger option, the opinion that men with larger penises are more masculine, and the opinion that men who use larger condoms are more masculine significantly predicted larger sized condom preferences. Gender, race/ethnicity (dichotomized as White/non-White), gendered identity, and condom malfunction experience did not significantly predict larger sized condom preferences. Additionally, gender-specific trends were found when the analysis was run independently among men and among women. The implications of these results are discussed and possibilities for subsequent research are suggested.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2016

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Grauerholz, Liz

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Sociology

Degree Program

Applied Sociology; Domestic Violence

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006375

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006375

Language

English

Release Date

August 2016

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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