Abstract

This project investigates the synthesis of a class of compounds derived from a marine-based natural product and probes how iterative changes to its structure affect its derivatives' biological efficacy. The compound class of interest are the motuporamines which were isolated from the sea sponge Xestospongia exigua collected off the coast of Motupore island in Papua, New Guinea. The compounds for this project are predicated upon dihydromotuporamine C (Motu33), the compound that has been shown to be both cytotoxic to MDA-MB231 breast carcinoma cells and has antimetastatic efficacy. The motuporamine scaffold contains a large fifteen-membered saturated macrocycle and an appended polyamine component. A series of Motu33 derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to target the polyamine transport system as well as inhibit cell migration of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. By altering the polyamine component of the system we attempted to build smart antimetastatic compounds which target the upregulated polyamine transport system of human pancreatic cancers and block their migration.

Graduation Date

2016

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Phanstiel, Otto

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Medicine

Department

Molecular Biology and Microbiology

Degree Program

Biotechnology; Professional Science Master's

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006505

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006505

Language

English

Release Date

December 2016

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Included in

Biotechnology Commons

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