Abstract

Thermal poling is a technique which involves the application of a strong DC electric field to a glass substrate heated below its glass transition temperature (Tg). Following the treatment, a static electric field is frozen inside the glass matrix, effectively breaking its centrosymmetry. Historically, this treatment has been used as a way to gain access to second order non-linear optical properties in glasses. However, recent efforts have shown that the treatment was responsible for structural changes as well as surface property modifications. Our study was focused on using this technique to tailor surface properties in oxide (borosilicate and niobium borophosphate) and chalcogenide glasses. A strong emphasis was put on trying to control all changes at the micrometric scale. After poling, property changes were assessed using a set of characterization tools: the Maker fringes technique (a Second Harmonic Generation ellipsometry technique), micro-Second Harmonic Generation (µ-SHG), vibrational spectroscopy and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Surface reactivity in borosilicate glasses was effectively changed while in niobium borophosphate and chalcogenide glasses, the optical properties were controlled linearly and non-linearly. Finally, property changes were effectively controlled at the micrometric scale. This opens up new applications of thermal poling as a mean to design glass substrate for integrated photonics and lab-on-a-chip devices.

Graduation Date

2016

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Richardson, Kathleen

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Materials Science Engineering

Degree Program

Materials Science and Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006471

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006471

Language

English

Release Date

December 2016

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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