Abstract

This dissertation addresses a gap in the existing sustainability behavior research, by integrating research from the social sciences about environmental attitudes and knowledge with approaches from engineering regarding the characteristics of the built environment. Specifically, this dissertation explores the role of both environmental knowledge and design features within the built environment on building occupants' energy behaviors throughout the course of an environmental conservation campaign. Data were collected from 240 dormitory residents using a multi-phase questionnaire approach to study these factors and their combined impact within the context of environmental sustainability practices on UCF's campus. The results from a series of correlational and multiple regression analyses indicate that both the design components of the built environment and the attitudes held by individuals within that environment have a significant positive influence on behaviors. Furthermore, these findings indicated that this effect increases significantly when the two factors work together. Finally, the results show that pro- environmental attitudes and behaviors can be successfully targeted through a cue-based energy conservation campaign. By addressing a gap in the extant Human Factors research about the relationship between attitudinal factors and the built environment, this dissertation provides a unique contribution to the field and points the way towards development of promising solutions for encouraging sustainable behaviors.

Graduation Date

2016

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Jentsch, Florian

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Psychology; Human Factors Cognitive Psychology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006500

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006500

Language

English

Release Date

December 2016

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Share

COinS