Abstract

Laser filamentation is a nonlinear process involving high-energy, ultrashort pulses that create narrow, non-diffracting structures over many times the Raleigh length. While many of the characteristics of filaments can vary greatly depending on the physical parameters used to create them, they share several defining features: a high intensity core, a lower intensity cladding of photons that serves as an energy reservoir to the core, and spectral broadening into a supercontinuum. While there have been many studies on the creation and control of multiple filaments from one laser pulse and a few studies on the interaction of two single filaments, many fundamental questions concerning the nature of this interaction still exist. This thesis seeks to explore the correlation between ultrashort pulses involving spatial separation, temporal delay, and relative degree of polarization using an interferometric approach. Evaluating the beam profiles and spectrum that result from varying those parameters.

Graduation Date

2016

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Richardson, Martin

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Optics and Photonics

Department

Optics and Photonics

Degree Program

Optics and Photonics

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006531

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006531

Language

English

Release Date

November 2021

Length of Campus-only Access

5 years

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Campus-only Access)

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