Abstract

Beer is a commodity that has been produced and consumed by humans for millennia. Within the U.S., the craft beer industry has grown considerably over the last decade, accounting for 19% of all beers sales in 2014. Despite this increased market presence, craft beer marketing and production has received little anthropological consideration. To address this dearth of case studies, I consider the local craft brewery scene, or area of activity, in Orlando Florida. My 2016 ethnographic research reveals that the local craft brewery scene exhibits both variation in identity and community locations. Interactions among breweries present opportunities for local breweries to build and grow their brands. Collected data elucidate the choices and decisions that craft brewery operators consider when producing beer, developing facilities, and promoting their beers and brand images. I conclude that the breweries create brand identity and grow their customer base and distribution through planned decisions as well as reactionary choices based on outside events. Such considerations are relevant for understanding the formation of a business's identity and brand identity while producing a craftwork product, as well the communities of each brewery interact with communities outside of the specific scene.

Graduation Date

2017

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Matejowsky, Ty

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Anthropology

Degree Program

Anthropology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006589

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006589

Language

English

Release Date

May 2017

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Included in

Anthropology Commons

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