Abstract

This study analyzed the scholarly discussions surrounding the topic of animal testing for vaccine potency and safety in humans. The primary stakeholders in this discussion are the scientists, medical professionals, and researchers who are involved in animal models and alternative testing methods, specifically related to vaccine development. The debate among these professionals regarding alternative methods, which encompasses any testing approach that does not involve animals, has been analyzed. This project looks at the argument from a historical perspective, which provides background context for the current debate and an understanding of how the current arguments originated. The changing mindset over time of using animals has been explored, as well as conversations and arguments about alternative methods. Research questions and prior questions consider the conversation's historical influences on this present day debate and are answered in this analysis. Persuasive language has been looked at, with a consideration of how it is used both within and outside the research community, as well as the influences the various stakeholders have on one another. The burgeoning field of the rhetoric of health and medicine provides a forum and a community of scholars for a rhetorical analysis such as this one to be discussed and the findings considered for other rhetorical studies. This research design project provides a comprehensive rhetorical analysis that uses the topoi theory and a textual-intertextual analysis as a framework, along with detailed coding of the texts. This project shows the advantages of a combined rhetorical approach that leads to understanding a debate through identifying multiple layers of argument. The findings and its implications for those within rhetoric, the scholarly community, as well as the scientific field are discussed in the final chapter.

Graduation Date

2017

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Scott, Blake

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

Writing and Rhetoric

Degree Program

English; Rhetoric & Composition

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006609

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006609

Language

English

Release Date

May 2020

Length of Campus-only Access

3 years

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Campus-only Access)

Share

COinS