Abstract

This thesis examines the effect of population losses from outbreaks of the Bubonic Plague on capital investment for labor saving technology in England. The cities in Middlesex and Norfolk advance the economy in their surrounding areas. Northumberland's access to Newcastle-Upon-Tyne did not house as much wealth for Coquetdale and Glendale. However, Edward I's constant investment in the recently acquired Scottish territory provided the area with income from the crown. While the decrease in population was catastrophic and presented social turmoil, the surviving population continued to make economic adjustments. The economic adaptations provided relief to a strained population. Trade should have diminished along the same rate as population. Mills, therefore, also should have decreased in a similar manner. However, commerce increased faster than the population in areas of England. As this study has shown, people were extracting loans and maintaining mills in the hundreds and wards. The continued investigations into milling property highlights the interest from local creditors. The number of mills did not decrease at the same rate as the population after the last outbreak of plague. Milling represented an industry of innovation in various areas of England.

Graduation Date

2017

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Larson, Peter

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

History

Degree Program

History

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006777

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006777

Language

English

Release Date

August 2017

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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