Abstract

The epidemiologic transition has shifted major causes of mortality from infectious disease to chronic disease; however, infectious diseases are again re-emerging as a major global concern (Diamond, 1997; Karlen, 1995; McNeil, 1976). This research aimed to identify potential areas of infectious disease influence that are not health-related in order to help governments and policymakers establish new policies, correct current policies, or further address these issues in order to effectively prevent and combat infectious disease. This study employed a retrospective, cross-sectional, non-experimental design via structural equation modeling (SEM) and examined tuberculosis incidence rates at the country-level. Secondary data from open-source, international databases like World Bank's World Development Indicators, World Governance Indicators, and World Health Organization for the year 2014 was utilized. Results revealed that the latent constructs of political stability, health system indicators, and detection policies directly affected tuberculosis incidence rates; they also exhibited an indirect effect due to covariation. Economic stability did not direct affect tuberculosis incidence, but it indirectly influenced incidence through the covariation of political stability, health system indicators, and detection policies. As a country's political stability increased, tuberculosis incidence decreased. As positive health system indicators increased, tuberculosis incidence decreased. Countries with more Xpert detection policies in place experienced an apparent increase in tuberculosis incidence.

Graduation Date

2016

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Unruh, Lynn

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Health and Public Affairs

Degree Program

Public Affairs; Health Services Management and Research

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006842

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006842

Language

English

Release Date

June 2017

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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