Abstract

Citizenship is often referred to as the forgotten outcome of colleges and universities. The present study examined the relationship between undergraduate students' perceived citizenship level and different types of civic experiences (service-learning, community service, and peer-to-peer civic discussions) and also different demographic factors (gender, race/ethnicity, and parental level of education) at a public institution using the Personal and Social Responsibility Inventory. This study used structural equation modeling and multiple regression analysis. This marks the first time these variables have been researched together. This study found a significant correlation between both community service and peer-to-peer civic discussions in relation to citizenship level. Yet, service-learning frequency was not found to be a significant factor. On the other hand, all three civic experiences together was found to be significantly correlated to citizenship aptitudes. Leading the researcher to find that a holistic (both inside and outside the classroom) approach to student citizenship is valuable for student development. Also, only one significant relationship was found between citizenship levels and any demographic variable (parental education level of doctorate or professional degree).

Graduation Date

2017

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Cintron Delgado, Rosa

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education and Human Performance

Department

Child, Family, and Community Sciences

Degree Program

Educational Leadership; Higher Education

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006927

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006927

Language

English

Release Date

12-15-2017

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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