Abstract

The purpose of this thesis is to show a transformation around the scientific revolution from the sixteenth to seventeenth centuries against a Whig approach in which it still lingers in the history of science. I find the transformations of modern science through the cosmological models of Nicholas Copernicus, Johannes Kepler, Galileo Galilei and Isaac Newton. Since of the enormous content, I shall only pay particular attention to Copernicus and Newton in which the emerging sciences transformed the cosmos on what Alexandre Koyré calls from a "closed world to infinite universe". As an interdisciplinary approach, I used the methods and inquiries from philosophy and history to explain the cosmological transformation in the sciences. The first part deals on the philosophic content of Michel Foucault and Thomas Kuhn which help to provide insight though their systematic thoughts are incompatible. The second part deals in the historic contents from Copernicus' doctrine, De revolutionibus, to Newton's mechanics, Principia. My ultimate outcome is to demonstrate the multi-perspective dimension of knowledge in which interdisciplinary studies shows transformation of the sciences and its effects on history.

Graduation Date

2017

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Jones, Donald

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Graduate Studies

Degree Program

Interdisciplinary Studies

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0006862

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0006862

Language

English

Release Date

December 2017

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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