Abstract

This dissertation is an investigation of the nanoscale characteristics and mechanism of electrolessly deposited silver metal seeded by gold nanoparticles. The process of growing seed-nanoparticles on a polymer surface was studied. Several bifunctional amines and organic reducing agents were used to explore how these chemical factors affect the size and distribution of gold nanoparticles formed at the interface. The nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). An electroless deposition (ED) bath developed by Danscher was selected to study electroless deposition of silver in detail. The chemical species in the bath were varied to determine how concentration, nature of the carboxylate buffering species, and the presence and absence of gum arabic affect the morphology of silver metal formed by ED and the overall rate of deposition at the surface. The kinetics of deposition using the Danscher bath was studied in detail to elucidate the mechanism of ED. Knowledge generated from this investigation can be used to expand applications of silver ED where strict control over the nanoscale morphology of the deposited metal is required to obtain specific chemical and physical properties.

Graduation Date

2018

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Kuebler, Stephen

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Chemistry

Degree Program

Chemistry

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007009

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007009

Language

English

Release Date

May 2018

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Included in

Chemistry Commons

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