Abstract

College students are often faced with the temptation of engaging in academic media multitasking and binge watching or completing their academic coursework in a timely and effective manner. A quantitative survey (N = 651) explored trait individual differences in self-control and academic delay of gratification and situational individual differences in enjoyment, reward, procrastination, regret, and guilt as predictors of academic media multitasking frequency, binge watching frequency, and binge watching duration. Stepwise regressions reveal that self-control is not a predictor of these media behaviors, while age and greater enjoyment were the only predictors of academic media multitasking and gender and greater enjoyment were the only predictors of binge watching duration. On the other hand, the other five variables provided insight on what predicted binge watching frequency: academic delay of gratification, reward, procrastination, regret, and guilt. Greater self-control also led to greater academic delay of gratification. Lastly, there were small positive correlations between all of the media behaviors except for academic media multitasking and binge watching frequency. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed.

Graduation Date

2018

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Rubenking, Bridget

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Communication

Degree Program

Communication; Mass Communication Track

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0007053

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0007053

Language

English

Release Date

May 2018

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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