Abstract

Investigated differences in attentional processes between children diagnosed with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and their classroom peers. Models of attention gleaned from laboratory experiments provided a theoretical structure for hypothesizing between-group attentional differences. Seventy-five children with ADHD and 36 normal control children were observed in their regular classrooms over a 1-week time interval. Explication of between-group differences revealed that children with ADHD were approximately 21% less attentive on average. Both groups exhibited an accelerating-decelerating pattern of attention over time, however, children with ADHD cycled at a rate twice that of same-aged peers. Six variables derived from observed attention were examined for diagnostic utility using logistical regression, odds ratios, total predictive value, and receiver operating characteristics. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Graduation Date

2005

Semester

Summer

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0000686

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0000686

Language

English

Release Date

October 2018

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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