Keywords

Learning; multimedia; gestures; mental models; cognitive load; dual code hypothesis

Abstract

Gestures and speech have been intertwined since the beginning of human communication. Recently the role of gestures in cognition and learning has become a topic of interest in both cognitive and educational psychology. Some researchers have speculated that gestures inherently communicate information that is not provided in purely verbal communication, and that this supplemental information can lead to more thorough mental models in the receiver by acting on a physical/motor modality in addition to the two modalities proposed in the dual code hypothesis. To further understand this issue, in this study, we examined the effects of watching a gesturing or a non-gesturing lecturer on the learner*s cognitive load and mental model development. The results have implications for cognitive psychology as well as educational psychology, particularly in multimedia learning.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2015

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Gill, Michele

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Education and Human Performance

Department

Teaching, Learning and Leadership

Degree Program

Education and Human Performance

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0005760

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0005760

Language

English

Release Date

August 2015

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Education and Human Performance; Education and Human Performance -- Dissertations, Academic

Included in

Education Commons

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