Keywords

Tinker toy test; neuropsychology; executive function; psychology

Abstract

An evaluation of executive functioning is a critical component of a comprehensive assessment of higher cerebral functioning. The Tinker Toy Test (TTT) was introduced in 1982. This test allows an individual to demonstrate the extent of their executive capacities by permitting them to initiate, plan, and structure a potentially complex activity and carry it out independently in an unstructured fashion and administration is simple. This is a departure from more complex and structured tests of executive function. There is a dearth of research on the TTT and this study seeks to examine some of the psychometric properties of this instrument; i.e., working time minimum, gender effects, convergent and divergent validity, and potential intellectual correlates. Participants included 10 male and 30 female student volunteers from a large university in Central Florida. Participants had no history of neurologic disease/trauma or conditions that would affect motor functioning of the upper extremities. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire, the WASI-II, and the TTT. A two-way mixed-design ANOVA examining TTT scores as a function of work time and gender revealed a non-significant gender main effect, F(1, 21) = .09, p = .767. The work time main effect was not significant, , F(1, 21) = .324, p = .575. A significant work time x gender interaction was observed, F(1, 21) = 4.983, p = .037. Convergent validity was assessed by comparing the TTT scores with the Matrix Reasoning subtest, r(38) = .32, p = .044, and the Similarities, r(38) = .34, p = .03, subtest on the WASI-II. Divergent validity was assessed by comparing TTT scores to the Block Design subtest of the WASI-II, r(38) = .245, p = .127. No significant correlation was found between intelligence and TTT (VCI, r(38) = -.16, p = .335; PRI, r(38) = .15, p = .344; and FSIQ, r(38) = -.02, p = .928). The data supports the continued use of the 5-minute working time minimum presented by Lezak, as this temporal index was a more accurate representation of executive functioning. This study demonstrated no association between TTT scores and intellectual functioning. The findings of this study support the validity of this underutilized test of executive functioning and its inclusion in neuropsychological test batteries.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2015

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Fouty, Ed

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Sciences

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0005802

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0005802

Language

English

Release Date

August 2015

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Sciences; Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic

Included in

Psychology Commons

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