Keywords

Social Movements, Frame Analysis, Midwifery, Homebirth, home birth, collective action frames

Abstract

This thesis illuminates the experiences, motives, and framing process of a cohort of homebirthing women in Tucson, Arizona who embody the collective action frames of the national homebirth movement. A model of birth frame construction, alignment and adoption is presented that expands current theory on social movement framing processes, cognitive liberation, and life politics in health and self-help related movements. The study explores the evolution of homebirth midwifery nationally and locally. It articulates the main collective action frames that argue against standard maternity care and presents the alternatives proffered by the homebirth movement. It presents micro-level experiences of movement pioneers, macro-articulations of movement leaders, respondent's micro-level birth model framing processes; and how "life politics" have changed birth culture in America. Written materials augmented data obtained from in-depth interviews with (n=38) respondents who homebirthed in Tucson between 1970 and 2000. Content analysis was utilized and grounded theory was employed.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2006

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Huff-Corzine, Lin

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Sociology and Anthropology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001072

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001072

Language

English

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

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