Keywords

System Identification, Subspace Identification, Subspace Tracking, Fault Detection

Abstract

The proposed research is devoted to devising system identification and fault detection approaches and algorithms for a system characterized by nonlinear dynamics. Mathematical models of dynamical systems and fault models are built based on observed data from systems. In particular, we will focus on statistical subspace instrumental variable methods which allow the consideration of an appealing mathematical model in many control applications consisting of a nonlinear feedback system with nonlinearities at both inputs and outputs. Different solutions within the proposed framework are presented to solve the system identification and fault detection problems. Specifically, Augmented Subspace Instrumental Variable Identification (ASIVID) approaches are proposed to identify the closed-loop nonlinear Hammerstein systems. Then fast approaches are presented to determine the system order. Hard-over failures are detected by order determination approaches when failures manifest themselves as rank deficiencies of the dynamical systems. Geometric interpretations of subspace tracking theorems are presented in this dissertation in order to propose a fault tolerance strategy. Possible fields of application considered in this research include manufacturing systems, autonomous vehicle systems, space systems and burgeoning bio-mechanical systems.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2006

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Leonessa, Alexander

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering;

Degree Program

Mechanical Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0000915

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0000915

Language

English

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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