Keywords

intelligent tutoring systems, modeling, personality preferences, learning style preferences

Abstract

This thesis hypothesizes that a method for selecting instructional strategies (specifically media) based in part on a relationship between learning style preference and personality preference provides more relevant and understandable feedback to students and thereby higher learning effectiveness. This research investigates whether personality preferences are valid predictors of learning style preferences. Since learning style preferences are a key consideration in instructional strategies and instructional strategies are a key consideration in learning effectiveness, this thesis contributes to a greater understanding of the relationship between personality preferences and effective learning in intelligent tutoring systems (ITS). This research attempts to contribute to the goal of a "truly adaptive ITS" by first examining relationships between personality preferences and learning style preferences; and then by modeling the influences of personality on learning strategies to optimize feedback for each student. This thesis explores the general question "what can personality preferences contribute to learning in intelligent tutoring systems?" So, why is it important to evaluate the relationship between personality preferences and learning strategies in ITS? "While one-on-one human tutoring is still superior to ITS in general, this approach is idiosyncratic and not feasible to deliver to [any large population] in any cost-effective manner." (Loftin, 2004). Given the need for ITS in large, distributed populations (i.e. the United States Army), it is important to explore methods of increasing ITS performance and adaptability. Findings of this research include that the null hypothesis that "there is no dependency between personality preference variables and learning style preference variables" was partly rejected. Highly significant correlations between the personality preferences, openness and extraversion, were established for both the active-reflective and sensing-intuitive learning style preferences. Discussion of other relationships is provided.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2006

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Proctor, Michael

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Other

Degree Program

Modeling and Simulation

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001403

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001403

Language

English

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Included in

Engineering Commons

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