Keywords

Hospitality, Management, Co-op, Internship, Classroom, Experiential Learning

Abstract

This study analyzed hospitality management student perceptions of learning both inside the classroom environment and student perceptions of learning in their experiential learning assignments outside the classroom. There were 681 students attending the Rosen College of Hospitality Management at the University of Central Florida who participated in this study. A modified version of the Predicting Learner Advancement through Cooperative Education (P.L.A.C.E.) instrument was used in order to collect data for the study. The P.L.A.C.E. instrument was developed to be a standardized instrument measuring pre-graduation learning outcomes in the following four areas: (a) career development, (b) academic functions achievement, (c) work skills development, and (d) personal growth/development (Parks et al., 2001). This study attempted to add to the literature regarding learning outcomes by contrasting learning in the classroom environment and cooperative education learning assignments. Many leading hospitality curriculums currently incorporate an experiential learning component into their curriculums. Some of the documented benefits of experiential learning or cooperative education programs include: (a) improved student self confidence, self-concept, and improved social skills (Gillan, Davies, & Beissel, 1984). (b) increased practical knowledge and skills (Williams et al. (1993), and (c) enhanced employment opportunities (Clark, 1994; Sharma, Mannel & Rowe, 1995). This study confirmed all of these previously documented benefits of experiential learning, and identified new learning outcomes or benefits for students who participate in experiential learning, such as an increased understanding of how organizations function, increased ability to view career expectations realistically, an increased network of professional contacts, increased ability to take initiative, increased ability to adapt to change, increased leadership skills and increased financial management skills. Unlike many other studies, this study investigated student perceptions of learning in both their classroom environments and their experiential learning assignments at the same time. This allowed the researcher a unique opportunity to compare and contrast each learning environment and identify specific benefits for each.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2006

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Tubbs, LeVester

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education

Department

Educational Research, Technology and Leadership

Degree Program

Educational Leadership

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001284

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001284

Language

English

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

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