Title

Influence of elevated CO2 on the fungal community in a coastal scrub oak forest soil investigated with terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

Authors

Authors

M. Klamer; M. S. Roberts; L. H. Levine; B. G. Drake;J. L. Garland

Comments

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Abbreviated Journal Title

Appl. Environ. Microbiol.

Keywords

GRADIENT GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS; RIBOSOMAL-RNA GENES; T-RFLP ANALYSIS; ATMOSPHERIC CO2; MICROBIAL COMMUNITY; CARBON-DIOXIDE; ECTOMYCORRHIZAL; FUNGI; ENVIRONMENTAL-SAMPLES; BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES; POPULUS-GRANDIDENTATA; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Microbiology

Abstract

Sixteen open-top chambers (diameter, 3.66 m) were established in a scrub oak habitat in central Florida where vegetation was removed in a planned burn prior to chamber installation. Eight control chambers have been continuously exposed to ambient air and eight have been continuously exposed to elevated CO2 at twice-ambient concentration (similar to700 ppm) for 5 years. Soil cores were collected from each chamber to examine the influence of elevated atmospheric CO, on the fungal community in different soil fractions. Each soil sample was physically fractionated into bulk soil, rhizosphere soil, and roots for separate analyses. Changes in relative fungal biomass were estimated by the ergosterol technique. In the bulk soil and root fractions, a significantly increased level of ergosterol was detected in the elevated CO, treatments relative to ambient controls. Fungal community composition was determined by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. The specificities of different ITS primer sets were evaluated against plant and fungal species isolated from the experimental site. Changes in community composition were assessed by principal component analyses of T-RFLP profiles resolved by capillary electrophoresis. Fungal species richness, defined by the total number of terminal restriction fragments, was not significantly affected by either CO2 treatment or soil fraction.

Journal Title

Applied and Environmental Microbiology

Volume

68

Issue/Number

9

Publication Date

1-1-2002

Document Type

Article

Language

English

First Page

4370

Last Page

4376

WOS Identifier

WOS:000177718000028

ISSN

0099-2240

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