Title

Whole-genome plasticity among Mycobacterium avium subspecies: Insights from comparative genomic hybridizations

Authors

Authors

C. W. Wu; J. Glasner; M. Collins; S. Naser;A. M. Talaat

Comments

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Abbreviated Journal Title

J. Bacteriol.

Keywords

ACQUIRED-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-SYNDROME; ESCHERICHIA-COLI; GENE-EXPRESSION; OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAYS; TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATORS; JOHNES-DISEASE; CROHNS-DISEASE; PARATUBERCULOSIS; COMPLEX; TUBERCULOSIS; Microbiology

Abstract

Infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease in cattle and is also implicated in cases of Crohn's disease in humans. Another closely related strain, M. avium subsp. avium, is a health problem for immunocompromised patients. To understand the molecular pathogenesis of M. avium subspecies, we analyzed the genome contents of isolates collected from humans and domesticated or wildlife animals. Comparative genomic hybridizations indicated distinct lineages for each subspecies where the closest genomic relatedness existed between M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates collected from human and clinical cow samples. Genomic islands (n = 24) comprising 846 kb were present in the reference M. avium subsp. avium strain but absent from 95% of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates. Additional analysis identified a group of 18 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-associated islands comprising 240 kb that were absent from most of the M. avium subsp. avium isolates. Sequence analysis of DNA regions flanking the genomic islands identified three large inversions in addition to several small inversions that could play a role in regulation of gene expression. Analysis of genes encoded in the genomic islands reveals factors that are probably important for various mechanisms of virulence. Overall, M. avium subsp. avium isolates displayed a higher level of genomic diversity than M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates. Among M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates, those from wildlife animals displayed the highest level of genomic rearrangements that were not observed in other isolates. The presented findings will affect the future design of diagnostics and vaccines for Johne's and Crohn's diseases and provide a model for genomic analysis of closely related bacteria.

Journal Title

Journal of Bacteriology

Volume

188

Issue/Number

2

Publication Date

1-1-2006

Document Type

Article

Language

English

First Page

711

Last Page

723

WOS Identifier

WOS:000234677400038

ISSN

0021-9193

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