Title

INTERPRETATIONS OF PRE-HISPANIC RITUAL VIOLENCE AT TUCUME, PERU, FROM CUT MARK ANALYSIS

Authors

Authors

J. M. Toyne

Comments

Authors: contact us about adding a copy of your work at STARS@ucf.edu

Abbreviated Journal Title

Lat. Am. Antiq.

Keywords

HUMAN SACRIFICE; ANDES; MOCHE; Archaeology

Abstract

Archaeological residues of ritual are often ephemeral, and reconstructing the dynamics of performed actions that create deposits can be difficult. Rituals associated with the dead are common across many cultures since all human,groups have specific means of disposing of corpses. Evidence of peri- and postmortem manipulation of human remains,such as cutting. dismemberment, or disarticulation can provide details of the sequence of actions performed related to the circumstances surrounding death and the possible social meaning of those behaviors. Cur marks observed on the upper chest and throat of 93 percent of 117 children and men found interred at the Temple oldie Sacred Stone at Tucume. Peru are consistent with three symbolic behaviors: cutting the throat, opening the chest cavity, and decapitation. This patterning of skeletal trauma demonstrates that a highly elaborate series of violent ritual behaviors. was carried out on a regular basis at tins location, beginning in the Late Intermediate Period (similar to AD. 1100) through to the end oldie Late Horizon Inca occupation of the site around A.D. 1532. The recent finds of bioarchaeological evidence of ritual violence across the Andes suggests that, although rare, these mortuary remains provide important clues to the elaborate nature of ritual behaviors at different sites.

Journal Title

Latin American Antiquity

Volume

22

Issue/Number

4

Publication Date

1-1-2011

Document Type

Article

Language

English

First Page

505

Last Page

523

WOS Identifier

WOS:000298825100006

ISSN

1045-6635

Share

COinS