Title

Non-Erotic Cognitive Distractions During Sexual Activity in Sexual Minority and Heterosexual Young Adults

Authors

Authors

K. Lacefield;C. Negy

Comments

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Abbreviated Journal Title

Arch. Sex. Behav.

Keywords

Spectatoring; Cognitive distractions; Sexual activity; Sexual; orientation; BODY-IMAGE; ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION; ATTENTIONAL FOCUS; GAY MEN; GENDER; SATISFACTION; ATTITUDES; ANXIETY; IDENTITY; LESBIANS; Psychology, Clinical; Social Sciences, Interdisciplinary

Abstract

The present study examined 100 lesbian and gay college students and 100 heterosexual students to determine whether group differences exist in frequency of a range of non-erotic cognitive distractions during sexual activity. Non-erotic cognitive distraction is a descriptive term for both self-evaluative cognitions related to physical performance and body image concerns, as well as additional cognitive distractions (e.g., contracting an STI or emotional concerns) during sexual activity. Participants were matched on gender (96 males and 104 females), age, and ethnicity, and completed questionnaires assessing frequency of non-erotic cognitive distractions during sexual activity, as well as measures of additional variables (trait and body image anxiety, attitudes toward sexual minorities, self-esteem, and religiosity). Results indicated that sexual minorities experienced significantly more cognitive distractions related to body image, physical performance, and STIs during sexual activity than heterosexuals. Regarding gender, men reported more distractions related to STIs than women. Interaction effects were observed between sexual orientation and gender for body image-, disease-, and external/emotional-based distractions. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Journal Title

Archives of Sexual Behavior

Volume

41

Issue/Number

2

Publication Date

1-1-2012

Document Type

Article

Language

English

First Page

391

Last Page

400

WOS Identifier

WOS:000302036800010

ISSN

0004-0002

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