Title

How often do surgeons intervene on shoulder labral lesions detected at MR examination? A retrospective review of MR examinations correlated with arthroscopy

Authors

Authors

T. Magee

Comments

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Abbreviated Journal Title

Br. J. Radiol.

Keywords

SPECIFICITY; SENSITIVITY; Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging

Abstract

Objective: We report the prevalence of surgical intervention on shoulder labral lesions detected at MR examinations and how surgeons describe labral tears seen at MR examinations in their arthroscopy reports. Methods: A retrospective review of 100 consecutive patients aged 50 years or younger who had shoulder labral tears on MR and went on to have surgery performed. It was determined whether surgical intervention was performed on the MR lesions. Results: Of these 100 patients, 72 had superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears, 38 had posterior labral tears and 28 had anterior labral tears on MR examination. All 100 patients went on to arthroscopy. All lesions described on MRI were described on arthroscopy. Of the 72 SLAP tears, 64 were described as fraying on arthroscopy with 51 debrided. The remaining eight SLAP tears were tacked surgically. Of the 38 posterior labral tears, 36 were described as fraying on arthroscopy with 29 debrided and 2 had surgical tacking performed. Of the 28 anterior labral tears described on MR examination, 26 had surgical tacking performed and 2 were debrided. There were four SLAP tears, two anterior labral tears and three posterior labral tears seen on arthroscopy but not seen on MR examination. Conclusion: In this series, a high percentage of SLAP tears and posterior labral tears described on MR examination did not have surgical tacking. Most anterior labral tears had surgical tacking. Based on the above, our surgeons request we describe superior and posterior labral lesions as fraying and/or tearing, unless we can see a displaced tear. Most anterior labral lesions are treated with surgical tacking. Advances in knowledge: MRI allows for sensitive detection of labral tears. The tears often are not clinically significant.

Journal Title

British Journal of Radiology

Volume

87

Issue/Number

1038

Publication Date

1-1-2014

Document Type

Review

Language

English

First Page

6

WOS Identifier

WOS:000339256600008

ISSN

0007-1285

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