Title

Strength and Function Response to Clinical Interventions of Older Women Categorized by Weakness and Low Lean Mass Using Classifications From the Foundation for the National Institute of Health Sarcopenia Project

Authors

Authors

M. S. Fragala; T. T. L. Dam; V. Barber; J. O. Judge; S. A. Studenski; P. M. Cawthon; R. R. McLean; T. B. Harris; L. Ferrucci; J. M. Guralnik; D. P. Kiel; S. B. Kritchevsky; M. D. Shardell; M. T. Vassileva;A. M. Kenny

Comments

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Abbreviated Journal Title

J. Gerontol. Ser. A-Biol. Sci. Med. Sci.

Keywords

Strength; Function; Sarcopenia; Gait speed; Clinical trials; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL; MUSCLE STRENGTH; PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE; VITAMIN-D; BODY-COMPOSITION; RELEVANT WEAKNESS; RISK-FACTORS; FRAILTY; ADULTS; SUPPLEMENTATION; Geriatrics & Gerontology; Gerontology

Abstract

Background. The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health Sarcopenia Project developed data-driven cutpoints for clinically meaningful weakness and low lean body mass. This analysis describes strength and function response to interventions based on these classifications. Methods. In data from four intervention studies, 378 postmenopausal women with baseline and 6-month data were evaluated for change in grip strength, appendicular lean mass corrected for body mass index, leg strength and power, and short physical performance battery (SPPB). Clinical interventions included hormones, exercise, and nutritional supplementation. Differences in outcomes were evaluated between (i) those with and without weakness and (ii) those with weakness and low lean mass or with one but not the other. We stratified analyses by slowness (walking speed <= 0.8 m/s) and by treatment assignment. Results. The women (72 +/- 7 years; body mass index of 26 +/- 5 kg/m(2)) were weak (33%), had low lean mass (14%), or both (6%). Those with weakness increased grip strength, lost less leg power, and gained SPPB score (p<.05) compared with nonweak participants. Stratified analyses were similar for grip strength and SPPB. With lean mass in the analysis, individuals with weakness had larger gains in grip strength and SPPB scores regardless of low lean mass (p<.01). Conclusions. Older women with clinically meaningful muscle weakness increased grip strength and SPPB, regardless of the presence of low lean mass following treatment with interventions for frailty. Thus, results suggest that muscle weakness, as defined by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health Sarcopenia Project, appears to be a treatable symptom.

Journal Title

Journals of Gerontology Series a-Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

Volume

70

Issue/Number

2

Publication Date

1-1-2015

Document Type

Article

Language

English

First Page

202

Last Page

209

WOS Identifier

WOS:000350121100008

ISSN

1079-5006

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