Abstract

The intent of this thesis was to test if one of the many fitness-tracking devices, Microsoft’s Band 2 (MSB2), is accurate and reliable in detecting changes in Heart Rate (HR) and R-R intervals, during the repeated trial of two conditions of a working-memory test known as the N-Back. A 2 (devices: ECG, MSB2) × 4 (epochs: baseline 1, 1-back task, baseline 2, 3-back task) repeated measures factorial design was conducted. The participants were simultaneously equipped to the MSB2 and an electrocardiogram (ECG). The results of this study validated the MSB2 for the use in a cognitive task. The study suggests that fitness-tracking devices with similar sampling rates and features are candidates for further exploration as alternatives to ECG, in hope of making the inclusion of physiological data in psychological research more available and accessible.

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Thesis Completion

2017

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

McConnell, Daniel

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Degree Program

B.S. in Psychology

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

4-21-2017

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