Abstract

This study examined variables related to the doctor-patient interaction that can predict college students’ trust in their physicians. Specifically, I examined if five personality variables, ethnicity, and gender were associated with attitudes toward physicians. A second aim of the study was to determine if there was a difference in the level of trust in physicians between pre-medical and non-pre-medical students. Surveys were administered to UCF students containing a series of questions compiled from the Interpersonal Physician Trust Scale, Interpersonal Trust Scale, Illness Attitude Scale, Big Five Inventory, Martin-Larsen Approval Motivation Scale-Short Form, Almost Perfect Scale-Revised and Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale-Short Form, as well as 13 original questions that I developed. The sample consisted of 211 UCF students. It was hypothesized that lower levels of mistrust of others, symptoms of hypochondria, introversion, need for approval, and perfectionism would correlate significantly with trust in medical doctors. It was also hypothesized that there would be a difference in the level of trust in physicians between pre-medical and non-premedical students. Results indicated that on average, most participants across ethnicity and gender expressed uncertainty about their level of trust in their physicians. Ethnicity was not associated significantly with trust in physician. Gender was also not associated significantly with trust in physician. For Hispanic participants, only introversion predicted trust in physician. For male participants, only hypochondria predicted trust in physician. Finally, pre-medical status was not associated significantly with a difference in physician trust.

Thesis Completion

2017

Semester

Fall

Thesis Chair

Negy, Charles

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Psychology

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

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