Abstract

This research seeks to unpack the narrative of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend using semiotics, particularly through Roland Barthes' work in Mythologies and A Lover's Discourse. The goal of this research is to demonstrate long-form storytelling's ability to interrogate and revisit criticism through consideration of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend's role as an ongoing satire of romantic comedies. This research culminated in a thesis discussing the semiotic myths that Crazy Ex-Girlfriend interrogates, and the process of deconstruction that occurs within the text. The thesis applied the "fragments" identified in Barthes' A Lover’s Discourse to corresponding scenes in Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, with a focus on the musical nature of the show. This research also analyzed Crazy Ex-Girlfriend's role as a deconstruction of the romantic comedy genre, and its position as either upholding or subverting the myth of the "crazy ex-girlfriend." Through applying A Lover's Discourse to an hour-long television drama (in this case Crazy Ex-Girlfriend), this research contributes to the field of cultural studies by considering network entertainment media from a critical perspective, and utilizing A Lover's Discourse in an innovative manner.

Thesis Completion

2018

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Mauer, Barry

Co-Chair

Preston-Sidler, Leandra

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

English

Degree Program

Literature

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Language

English

Access Status

Campus Access

Length of Campus-only Access

5 years

Release Date

5-1-2023

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