Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted disease that often presents as genital warts, but may also lead to cancers, including those of the vagina, penis, mouth and tonsils. Despite three vaccines being currently available to prevent HPV, the HPV vaccine retains a low national average vaccination rate when compared to the Tetanus-Diptheria- Pertussis (Tdap) vaccine. Considering the need for improvement it is important to identify factors that may be contributing to this low national immunization rate, one of them being parental race. The purpose of this literature review is to identify whether race affects parents' intent to vaccinate their children against HPV. A database search of CINAHL Plus with Full Text, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO was conducted and a total of 13 articles were reviewed based on the relevance to the purpose of the literature review. While racial differences were noted, there were other factors that also affect a parent's intent to vaccinate their children against HPV. There is more research to be done when looking at how race may independently affect a parent's intent to vaccinate their children against HPV.

Thesis Completion

2018

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Weiss, Josie

Degree

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.)

College

College of Nursing

Department

Nursing

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Language

English

Access Status

Campus Access

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Release Date

5-1-2019

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