Abstract

This thesis investigates an understudied question in the economics literature: how does sexual harassment experienced in and around public transportation affect labor market outcomes for women? Previous research suggests that access to public transport can improve labor market outcomes and that women's use of public transportation is sometimes limited by their experience of sexual harassment. It follows that when harassment is particularly widespread or severe – as is the case in much of South Asia – it may lead women who depend on public transportation for travel to make different labor market choices or not to work at all. If this effect exists, then it holds important implications for policymakers who aim to boost economic development and social equality by increasing women's labor force participation.

I analyze the case of Lahore, Pakistan using data from the Lahore Urban Transport Master Plan Household Interview Survey. I present a descriptive analysis of women's transportation usage, safety onboard transport, and employment in Lahore. I then use ordinary least squares and logistic regression analysis to assess the relationship between proxy variables for harassment and women's odds of employment, use of public transportation, and price and time of day of commute. Results do not support the hypothesis that sexual harassment on transportation affects labor market outcomes for women. Important limitations and suggestions for further research are discussed.

Thesis Completion

2018

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Guldi, Melanie

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Business Administration

Department

Economics

Degree Program

Economics

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Release Date

5-1-2018

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