Abstract

The history of Latin America and the Caribbean was irreversibly altered by the arrival of the conquistadors, destruction of native civilizations and implementation of colonialism for hundreds of years. However, Spain also introduced the high culture of the baroque to Latin America and the Caribbean, which mixed with the cultures of native and African peoples, creating new, distinct forms of literary expression. Subsequent post-colonial cultural movements attempted to explore and reaffirm the variety of cultures that shaped both regions, including the movement of Afrocubanismo in Cuba, which occurred from 1910-1940. Afrocubanismo was a movement intended to incorporate African folklore and music into traditional modes of art. While many authors and artists were instrumental to Afrocubanismo, Nicolás Guillén is considered to be the most influential author of the movement, due to his new and inventive style of poetry that incorporated both Spanish and African influences. This study will demonstrate how Guillén’s use of traditional poetic forms, the son and portrayal of everyday Afro-Cuban life reveal his vision for a post-colonial, transcultured Cuban society, rather than a Cuba subject to colonialism and acculturation.

Thesis Completion

2016

Semester

Spring

Thesis Chair

Villanueva, C. Alberto

Degree

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

Modern Languages and Literatures

Degree Program

Spanish

Location

Orlando (Main) Campus

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

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